Priority System

Priority System 

(within the categories of Drainage, Asphalt/Chipped Roads, and Graveled Roads

RED:         Highest Priority

Orange:      Significant Priority

GREEN:     Priority

Designations of Priority of Roadway types

  1. Arterial Roadways:

These are roads designed to move large volumes of traffic rapidly from one area to another, in the course of moving travelers in the most expeditious manner to specific locations (business areas or areas outside of the District) and are determined to be the most pressing issues due to traffic patterns, flows, and average daily counts, and are necessary to be deemed the highest priority of deployment of resources. These roadways will generally see resource deployment more rapidly than others, depending upon availability of financial, human, and equipment resources

  1. Collector Roadways

These types of roadways will have less average daily traffic counts as well as lower average daily counts than the Arterial roadways, and are moving travelers to either Arterial roadways and on to final destinations, or to local roadways, taking them to final destinations. These are determined to be significant priority of deployment of resources. These roadways will generally see resource deployment on a schedule that is dependent on the District’s ability to complete priority work on Arterial roadways first, as required, and is dependent upon availability of financial, human, and equipment resources.  

  1. Local Access Roadways

These types of roadways will have the least amount average daily traffic, serve local area access, ie, residential streets entering neighborhoods, or those streets and roads that feed into Collector or Arterial roadways. These are determined to be a (lower level) priority of deployment of resources. These roadways will generally see resource deployment on a schedule that is dependent on the District’s ability to complete priority work on Arterial and Collector roadways first, as required, and is dependent upon availability of financial, human, and equipment resources. Because of the lower priority of issues within this roadway type, it is uncertain when or if the issue will be resolved, based upon the limited amount of road maintenance resources that are currently available.

It is recognized that the priority system developed by the Streets and Roads Dept may seem insensitive about the concerns of local residents and property owners. Your S/R Dept understands that every inquiry IS a significant priority of the citizen asking for assistance. While every effort will always be made to ensure that as many issues are resolved as is possible, the very limited resources demand that the highest priorities as outlined in the Priority System are resolved first. This will necessitate other issues being put off for long periods of time, and in many cases, resources will not be available for solution relief. All citizen inquiries will be noted in the electronic record, and pin mapping will occur. When the Streets and Rods Dept is entering a “cluster’ area as shown on the pin-mapping, every effort will be made to mitigate and/or resolve issues noted within the cluster, based upon the Priority System. 

There are 400 miles of roadways in Pueblo West, 200 miles are gravel and 200 miles are paved/chipped surfaces. The District has 10 equipment - operator/staff, 3 motor graders, and four dump trucks available for maintaining gravel roads. In addition, there are two street maintenance workers assigned to asphalt/chip repair of the thousands of potholes that develop every year throughout the District.  These staff also manage drainage issues, trash dumping, mowing and trimming, dead animal removal, snow removal and street sanding, among others. 

The cost to pave/repave roads can reach as high as $500,000 per mile. At that rate, it would cost $100 million to pave the gravel roads in the District. In addition, engineering studies have evaluated drainage issues in the District, and has estimated that drainage needs exceed a total cost of $100 million as well. 

In the 2nd and third quarters of 2020, there were inquiries through the interactive community referral system on the Pueblo Metro District website. These were a combination of all of the functions performed by your S/R Dept., including gravel and asphalt road maintenance, drainage issues, trees/mowing needs, and trash removal.  For perspective, just one drainage issue took a crew of four staff operators 11 working days to resolve ONE issue presented in the CRM system.  On another, a three mile section of highly trafficked gravel road was graded by two graders, one water truck, and one dump truck. This took 7 full days to smooth this road out from a severe washboard condition. Due to dry weather, speed of traffic, and high traffic count, within three weeks the road was in need of maintenance again. A complete structural resurface of that road will occur over the course of 14-18 days using 8 of the ten equipment operator staff employed by the District. This is for ONE three mile section of gravel road! There is still 190 miles of gravel roads out that currently require some level of regular maintenance. Due to the extreme number of inquiries and needs, it is anticipated that a significant number of inquiries will not immediately be addressed, and, due to a lack of resources to accomplish mitigation or resolution of all inquiries, some inquiries/complaints/problems will not be resolved.